How to improve your home's air quality this Autumn

Autumn has arrived and as the cooler weather creeps upon us, we retreat indoors to enjoy hearty home cooked meals and cosy nights in.

Spending more time indoors over the coming months prompts us to carry out some autumnal adaptations to our home – a crisper take on the spring clean – focusing on changes you can make that improve your home’s indoor air quality, allowing you to breathe better.

A relatively new area of research, indoor air pollution is being talked about more and more following studies that indicate air quality within our homes can be more polluted than outdoor air1.

Compared to the great outdoors, indoor spaces are small, and our homes contain furnishings, upholstery, synthetic building materials and cleaning products that emit toxic compounds. Heating and cooling systems also contaminate indoor air quality fairly quickly.

Australian’s spend 90% (or more) of their time indoors2, it might sound like a lot, but when you think about the time you spend at work, home, school, public buildings, shopping centre, restaurants and even your car, you’re surrounded by four walls more often than not.

Spending so much time indoors highlights the need to improve indoor air quality and there are thing you can do - your own autumn adaptations - to enjoy cleaner air at home throughout the cooler seasons.




Choose fragrance free…

Artificial fragrances for the home seem to have become the norm for some households, and although it might be nice to come home to the scent of your choice, they are a big contributors to indoor air pollution. Most emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs)3; VOCs are emitted as gases from the air fresheners and can have both short and long term adverse effects on your health4.




Keep pets clean and groomed…

Pets are the best and make your house a home, but their dander and fur (not to mention the dirt they bring in) pollute the air in your home, and if you suffer from asthma or allergies can trigger symptoms. Regularly groom your pets, and if possible groom them outdoors so that loose fur and dander isn’t released into your home. Keep pets off soft furnishing and keep on top of the dusting with ENJO’s Dust Floor fibre and Dust Glove to pick up fur quickly without chemicals.




Reduce use of daily chemicals…

It’s almost impossible to remove chemicals from your home entirely, but there are small changes you can make to your daily routine to minimise the use and improve air quality in your home. Cleaning is a daily necessity, but using chemical cleaners doesn’t have to be. ENJO allows you to clean your kitchen, bathroom and living areas with just water. ENJO Fibres are specially woven to suit the surface and the purpose and the wet, wipe, dry action means you’re left creating an environment that is harder for mould and bacteria to grow in.




Bring the outdoors in…

Plants are a beautiful addition to the home that add more than a touch of greenery. Many plants have been proven to filter formaldehyde and other toxic particles in the air. They absorb these particulates while taking in carbon dioxide, they work their photosynthesising magic, and release oxygen back into the air.




Take your shoes off…

Take your shoes offTaking your shoes off will first and foremost help with keeping your floors clean, but it’s also important for improving your indoor air quality. Many contaminates make their way into your home on the bottom of your shoes kicking up into the air you breathe. Organise your entryway with a stylish storage solution for your kicks and pop on some super comfy indoor footwear, perfect for those autumnal nights in.




Improve ventilation…

Keeping outdoor air flowing through your home on a regular basis is really important for ensuring the air inside your home isn’t becoming stagnant. If your home doesn’t have good ventilation, make sure you open up windows and doors during the day, clean or change filters on heating and cooling systems, and use fans in bathrooms to discourage mould and bacteria.

Sources

1.https://www.epa.gov/indoor-air-quality-iaq
2.http://www.environment.gov.au/topics/environment-protection/air-quality/indoor-air
3.https://www.epa.gov/indoor-air-quality-iaq/care-your-air-guide-indoor-air-quality
4.https://www.epa.gov/indoor-air-quality-iaq/volatile-organic-compounds-impact-indoor-air-quality

1 Comment
Michele
23 Apr 2017
Awesome info for a cleaner living
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